Tag Archives: web browser

Chrome 24 fixes two dozen bugs. Promising a faster Chrome.

Google’s latest browser update landed today with little fanfare from Mountain View– just a tiny blog post proclaiming a faster, more stable Chrome. Diving into the build’s change notes, however, reveal Flash updates, bug fixes and support for MathML. Not a lot in the way of consumer facing features — though Bookmarks are now searchable, via the Chrome omnibox. Not as fancy as the last release, but we never to scoff at stability and speed. Check it out at the source link below.

The biggest improvement on the user side of things is the speed increase. Google’s own Octane JavaScript test shows that this is the fastest Chrome release yet. When the beta came out in November, the company was touting that Chrome had become 26 percent faster on Octane than it was last year. Now it’s even faster.

On the developer side, Google has made sure the HTML 5 datalist element now supports suggesting a date and time and has also added support for MathML. Datalist allows you to specify a list of suggested dates and times for input elements while MathML lets you write mathematical content in a consistent way. Other additions include experimental support for CSS Custom Filters.

Aside from the usual bug fixes, speed enhancements, a new version of V8 and Webkit, here is what Google listed as being new in Chrome version 24, according to its changelog notes on the previous beta and dev updates (added in chronological order):

  • Bookmarks are now searched by their title while typing into the omnibox with matching bookmarks being shown in the autocomplete suggestions pop-down list. Matching is done by prefix. Example: if there is a bookmark with a title of “Doglettes & Catlettes” typing any of the following into the omnibox will likely present the bookmark as a suggestion:: “dog”, “cat”, “cat dog”, “dog cat”, “dogle”, etc. Typing “ogle” or “lettes” will not match.

That’s right; there was only one new feature mentioned as this appears to be largely a cleanup and stability release. We did see, however, a huge number of notes on what issues have been addressed. Bugs related to Flash, speech input, YouTube, the omnibox, bookmark sync, installing extensions, memory leaks, JavaScript rendering, scrolling, and ones specific to Windows 8 have all been squashed. The full SVN revision loghas more details.

browser-features

On the security side, Chrome 24 coincidentally addresses 24 security holes (11 rated High, 8 marked Medium, and 5 considered Low):

  • [$1000] [162494] High CVE-2012-5145: Use-after-free in SVG layout. Credit to Atte Kettunen of OUSPG.
  • [$4000] [165622] High CVE-2012-5146: Same origin policy bypass with malformed URL. Credit to Erling A Ellingsen and Subodh Iyenger, both of Facebook.
  • [$1000] [165864] High CVE-2012-5147: Use-after-free in DOM handling. Credit to José A. Vázquez.
  • [167122] Medium CVE-2012-5148: Missing filename sanitization in hyphenation support. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Justin Schuh).
  • [166795] High CVE-2012-5149: Integer overflow in audio IPC handling. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Chris Evans).
  • [165601] High CVE-2012-5150: Use-after-free when seeking video. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Inferno).
  • [165538] High CVE-2012-5151: Integer overflow in PDF JavaScript. Credit to Mateusz Jurczyk, with contribution from Gynvael Coldwind, both of Google Security Team.
  • [165430] Medium CVE-2012-5152: Out-of-bounds read when seeking video. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Inferno).
  • [164565] High CVE-2012-5153: Out-of-bounds stack access in v8. Credit to Andreas Rossberg of the Chromium development community.
  • [Windows only] [164490] Low CVE-2012-5154: Integer overflow in shared memory allocation. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Chris Evans).
  • [Mac only] [163208] Medium CVE-2012-5155: Missing Mac sandbox for worker processes. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Julien Tinnes).
  • [162778] High CVE-2012-5156: Use-after-free in PDF fields. Credit to Mateusz Jurczyk, with contribution from Gynvael Coldwind, both of Google Security Team.
  • [162776] [162156] Medium CVE-2012-5157: Out-of-bounds reads in PDF image handling. Credit to Mateusz Jurczyk, with contribution from Gynvael Coldwind, both of Google Security Team.
  • [162153] High CVE-2013-0828: Bad cast in PDF root handling. Credit to Mateusz Jurczyk, with contribution from Gynvael Coldwind, both of Google Security Team.
  • [162114] High CVE-2013-0829: Corruption of database metadata leading to incorrect file access. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Jüri Aedla).
  • [Windows only] [162066] Low CVE-2013-0830: Missing NUL termination in IPC. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Justin Schuh).
  • [161836] Low CVE-2013-0831: Possible path traversal from extension process. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Tom Sepez).
  • [160380] Medium CVE-2013-0832: Use-after-free with printing. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Cris Neckar).
  • [154485] Medium CVE-2013-0833: Out-of-bounds read with printing. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Cris Neckar).
  • [154283] Medium CVE-2013-0834: Out-of-bounds read with glyph handling. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Cris Neckar).
  • [152921] Low CVE-2013-0835: Browser crash with geolocation. Credit to Arthur Gerkis.
  • [150545] High CVE-2013-0836: Crash in v8 garbage collection. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Cris Neckar).
  • [145363] Medium CVE-2013-0837: Crash in extension tab handling. Credit to Tom Nielsen.
  • [Linux only] [143859] Low CVE-2013-0838: Tighten permissions on shared memory segments. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Chris Palmer).

Google thus spent a total of $6,000 in bug bounties this release. These issues alone should be enough to get you to upgrade to Chrome 24

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Adair – A new web browser.

We came across a new pretty interesting web browser today. It’s name is Adair. The web browser is simple and yes! It’s really fast. It delivered a sweet 343 score in HTML5 testing which is good. The web browser has an in-built download manager. Why we are highlighting these features is because the web browser is not written by any great companies or maybe hundreds our thousands of employees but by a team of not more than 10 members. The browser’s coder and the CEO of the companies age is just 13. Yet he manages to run the company well and make applications that can get you busy.

Applications written by them are:

  • Patro, which is a modern text editor.
  • Adair, which is a web browser.
  • Adair File Manager, which is a download manager that comes inbuilt with the web browser and also standalone for PC Installation. However, it is said that it’s a suspended project which may come with a new name along with the release of the next version of the browser Adair.

Here are some of the screenshots of the latest version of the browser.

Adair Major Update comes with something powerful packed.

The “Simple Clean Fast” web browser by The Adair Team was out on 19th of May. However it was based on a /rebuilt/ that means a faster processing IE7 Engine was not impressive but at least it managed to do well and surf the web without even a single crash. But the new version update or say the major update is something that will be hard to ignore. A big jump from version 0.5.1 Release Candidate to 5.9 Stable…

The new version has the WebKit Engine which supports HTML5 which gives you a not bad 240 Score with 2 bonus points in the test. It is surely not the best because Maxthon is leading the way out of HTML5 with an awesome, really awesome 470 on 500. 

  • WHAT IS HTML5?

HTML5 is a markup language for structuring and presenting content for the World Wide Web, and is a core technology of the Internet originally proposed by Opera Software. It is the fifth revision of the HTML standard (created in 1990 and standardized as HTML4 as of 1997) and, as of May 2012, is still under development. Its core aims have been to improve the language with support for the latest multimedia while keeping it easily readable by humans and consistently understood by computers and devices (web
browsers, parsers, etc.). HTML5 is intended to subsume not only HTML 4, but XHTML 1 and DOM

“We are working hard on upgrading our engines and getting better and better to beat atleast Google Chrome with using the least processor usage” says AndreasCY from The Adair Team.

“We have our main concentration on the speed and ease on the browser, along with the smooth acceleration to avoid crashes” said AdityaDB also from the team.

We give this web browser a 4 watching the easy design maintaining the metro design style.  So if you want to go ahead and try this browser out you go here