chrome-logo-2011-04-27

Chrome 24 fixes two dozen bugs. Promising a faster Chrome.

Google’s latest browser update landed today with little fanfare from Mountain View– just a tiny blog post proclaiming a faster, more stable Chrome. Diving into the build’s change notes, however, reveal Flash updates, bug fixes and support for MathML. Not a lot in the way of consumer facing features — though Bookmarks are now searchable, via the Chrome omnibox. Not as fancy as the last release, but we never to scoff at stability and speed. Check it out at the source link below.

The biggest improvement on the user side of things is the speed increase. Google’s own Octane JavaScript test shows that this is the fastest Chrome release yet. When the beta came out in November, the company was touting that Chrome had become 26 percent faster on Octane than it was last year. Now it’s even faster.

On the developer side, Google has made sure the HTML 5 datalist element now supports suggesting a date and time and has also added support for MathML. Datalist allows you to specify a list of suggested dates and times for input elements while MathML lets you write mathematical content in a consistent way. Other additions include experimental support for CSS Custom Filters.

Aside from the usual bug fixes, speed enhancements, a new version of V8 and Webkit, here is what Google listed as being new in Chrome version 24, according to its changelog notes on the previous beta and dev updates (added in chronological order):

  • Bookmarks are now searched by their title while typing into the omnibox with matching bookmarks being shown in the autocomplete suggestions pop-down list. Matching is done by prefix. Example: if there is a bookmark with a title of “Doglettes & Catlettes” typing any of the following into the omnibox will likely present the bookmark as a suggestion:: “dog”, “cat”, “cat dog”, “dog cat”, “dogle”, etc. Typing “ogle” or “lettes” will not match.

That’s right; there was only one new feature mentioned as this appears to be largely a cleanup and stability release. We did see, however, a huge number of notes on what issues have been addressed. Bugs related to Flash, speech input, YouTube, the omnibox, bookmark sync, installing extensions, memory leaks, JavaScript rendering, scrolling, and ones specific to Windows 8 have all been squashed. The full SVN revision loghas more details.

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On the security side, Chrome 24 coincidentally addresses 24 security holes (11 rated High, 8 marked Medium, and 5 considered Low):

  • [$1000] [162494] High CVE-2012-5145: Use-after-free in SVG layout. Credit to Atte Kettunen of OUSPG.
  • [$4000] [165622] High CVE-2012-5146: Same origin policy bypass with malformed URL. Credit to Erling A Ellingsen and Subodh Iyenger, both of Facebook.
  • [$1000] [165864] High CVE-2012-5147: Use-after-free in DOM handling. Credit to José A. Vázquez.
  • [167122] Medium CVE-2012-5148: Missing filename sanitization in hyphenation support. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Justin Schuh).
  • [166795] High CVE-2012-5149: Integer overflow in audio IPC handling. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Chris Evans).
  • [165601] High CVE-2012-5150: Use-after-free when seeking video. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Inferno).
  • [165538] High CVE-2012-5151: Integer overflow in PDF JavaScript. Credit to Mateusz Jurczyk, with contribution from Gynvael Coldwind, both of Google Security Team.
  • [165430] Medium CVE-2012-5152: Out-of-bounds read when seeking video. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Inferno).
  • [164565] High CVE-2012-5153: Out-of-bounds stack access in v8. Credit to Andreas Rossberg of the Chromium development community.
  • [Windows only] [164490] Low CVE-2012-5154: Integer overflow in shared memory allocation. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Chris Evans).
  • [Mac only] [163208] Medium CVE-2012-5155: Missing Mac sandbox for worker processes. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Julien Tinnes).
  • [162778] High CVE-2012-5156: Use-after-free in PDF fields. Credit to Mateusz Jurczyk, with contribution from Gynvael Coldwind, both of Google Security Team.
  • [162776] [162156] Medium CVE-2012-5157: Out-of-bounds reads in PDF image handling. Credit to Mateusz Jurczyk, with contribution from Gynvael Coldwind, both of Google Security Team.
  • [162153] High CVE-2013-0828: Bad cast in PDF root handling. Credit to Mateusz Jurczyk, with contribution from Gynvael Coldwind, both of Google Security Team.
  • [162114] High CVE-2013-0829: Corruption of database metadata leading to incorrect file access. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Jüri Aedla).
  • [Windows only] [162066] Low CVE-2013-0830: Missing NUL termination in IPC. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Justin Schuh).
  • [161836] Low CVE-2013-0831: Possible path traversal from extension process. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Tom Sepez).
  • [160380] Medium CVE-2013-0832: Use-after-free with printing. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Cris Neckar).
  • [154485] Medium CVE-2013-0833: Out-of-bounds read with printing. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Cris Neckar).
  • [154283] Medium CVE-2013-0834: Out-of-bounds read with glyph handling. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Cris Neckar).
  • [152921] Low CVE-2013-0835: Browser crash with geolocation. Credit to Arthur Gerkis.
  • [150545] High CVE-2013-0836: Crash in v8 garbage collection. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Cris Neckar).
  • [145363] Medium CVE-2013-0837: Crash in extension tab handling. Credit to Tom Nielsen.
  • [Linux only] [143859] Low CVE-2013-0838: Tighten permissions on shared memory segments. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Chris Palmer).

Google thus spent a total of $6,000 in bug bounties this release. These issues alone should be enough to get you to upgrade to Chrome 24

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Facebook Chat for Mozilla Firefox

We saw many some notable web browsers in the year of 2012 of which some impressed us and some well, didn’t.

In my honest opinion – I don’t like social web browsers with less browsing space and more social icons – that makes a browser pretty heavy and I.. I just don’t like it.  Web Browser Widgets must be docked to the top of the browser in the toolbar or in an auto-hide bar or something like that.

But this post is about something else – Mozilla and Facebook are here with a chat extension for Firefox. We will have a look at it in this post.

After installing – It was different than I had thought. Other than the other applications, it was. The facebook sidebar is now displayed on every website you visit – minimizing the width of the website you are viewing.

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Get the widget for your Firefox.

Google Sound Search Song Recognition Widget Comes To Play Store

The official mobile clients of various cross-platform online music recognition services like Shazam and SoundHound are hugely popular for the level of ease they offer to identify and track information regarding any music you come across, be it anywhere. Inspired by the success of these tools, Google decided to incorporate one of its own within Android 4.1 Jelly Bean in the form of a neat little home screen widget. Call it a Christmas gift or Google’s decision to spread the feature to masses, the sameSound Search widget is now available in the Play Store for any device running Android 4.0 or higher. As with Shazam and SoundHound, the idea behind this widget is the same – to help users easily recognize any playing song. In addition, you can also purchase the detected songs from Google Play’s gigantic online music repository.

After you’ve installed the Sound Search widget, you may place it on your device’s home screen by navigating to the ‘Widgets’ tab within the app drawer, and then dragging the Sound Search widget to a vacant spot on your home screen. If you’re an Android 4.2 Jelly Bean or higher user, you can also place the widget on your device’s lockscreen by swiping rightwards all the way to the ‘Add Widget’ screen and then tapping the Sound Search option.

Sound-Search-Widget-Android-Main

Once the widget is installed, all you need to do is tap the ‘What’s this song’ button, move your device closer to the audio source (for quicker and better recognition), and wait for the magic to work. The widget will try to recognize the track, find a relevant match in Play Music, and eventually provide you with the result. Identified tracks can then be purchased from Google Play by tapping the result displayed on the widget. Another good thing about Sound Search is its capability to maintain a log of your recently identified tracks. To launch the history list, just tap the clock button on the widget.

Sound-Search-Widget-Android-Lockscreen Sound-Search-Widget-Android-List

When put to test with almost half a dozen different tracks, the widget impressed us by quickly and correctly identifying all of them without any trouble. Alongside each track, we were presented with the relevant title, artist, album art and scan time. In case the track is available in Google Play for sale, the widget also displays its price.

Please be informed that Sound Search requires Android 4.0 or higher to run. The widget is available at Google Play Store for free, and can be downloaded via the link provided below.

Download Sound Search For Google Play For Android

Windows 8 Style Skin for Windows Media Player

DeviantArt is a big network and a great opportunity for artists, designers, programmers, and hobbyists. Today, as I was surfing through deviantArt, being a huge Modern User Interface – I ended up with a beautiful skin for Windows Media Player in my deviantWatch folder.

https://i2.wp.com/fc09.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2012/327/1/3/windows_8_media_player_skin_v_1_1_beta__32_64_bit_by_luxorus-d5lhcdn.png

Our friend @luxorus has done a brilliant job in creating a Windows 8 UI Styled Skin for Windows Media Player. It is under-development stage so feel free to report a bug.

Download

Internet Explorer 10 – for Windows 7. *badum tss*

This week Internet Explorer 10 got released to public for download. It is for Windows 7. Not the metro version as Windows 7 is not meant for Metro Applications, but the native version of Internet Explorer 10. It consists of a much flatter user interface, noticeably faster browsing, better HTML5 rendering, and better security.

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Click to go to the download page.

Aura: Bleeding Edge of Chrome OS. Brief Post.

google chrome os aura

Our Samsung Series 5 Chromebook hasn’t gotten much love recently, but Google just pushed out an update through its developer channel, called “Aura.” We downloaded and tested the new update, and were surprised how suddenly… familiar it felt.

To put it simply, the changes in Aura are clearly designed to make the Chromebook feel like a laptop rather than a browser with a keyboard. There’s actually a desktop, with a background and everything. There are icons at the bottom on the left side, and a Quick Launch-style menu on the right side — it looks just like the Windows 7 taskbar. The right-most icon in the list opens a page of bookmarks that looks a whole lot like the Launch Pad feature in OS X Lion, except that instead of apps it’s shortcuts to websites. Aura feels like a mix between Mac OS and Windows 7, and it’s clear that’s where Google’s trying to take its operating system.

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Our favorite of the bookmarks is “Scratchpad,” which pops up a tiny floating window that lets you take quick notes — kind of a lighter Simplenote app. Scratchpad hooks into Google Docs, too, so you get a folder called “Scratchpad” with all your notes inside. It’s the closest thing to a non-Chrome app we’ve seen yet on Chrome OS, and it’s a pretty clever tool.

Everything still happens in Chrome, obviously, but fortunately you can now have multiple windows open at once — that makes multitasking a whole lot easier. As you drag windows around, they’ll snap to the display’s edges, so you can quickly move a window over and have it automatically fill half the screen. It works just like Aero Snaps in Windows 7, and by itself makes the Chromebook a lot more usable than just having one immovable window with infinite tabs. The whole OS felt faster than ever, too, enough to make us jealous that Chrome’s not always so responsive.

The basic concept of a Chromebook hasn’t changed with the new update, and we’re still more intrigued with what Google Drive could mean for Chrome OS anyway. Google’s clearly trying to make the Chromebook feel a little more like a laptop, with a user interface and design that should be a lot more familiar to people who use Windows or Mac OS, and like to open apps other than a full-screen browser from time to time. Google’s clearly still committed to the OS, and we’ll be watching to see where it goes next.

The newest update to Google’s Chrome OS is bringing the browser-based operating system a lot closer to a traditional windowing environment. Development channel (the least stable build) version 19.0.1048.17 adds Google’s hardware-accelerated Aura UI and window manager, bringing a desktop, overlapping windows, a Windows-style taskbar, and a Launchpad-esque app launcher to the platform.

According to the project’s wiki, the goal of Aura is to use hardware acceleration to achieve more computationally intensive tasks like large-scale animated transitions and effects as well as to provide the basis for a flexible windowing system. Aside from Aura, other new features in the latest dev channel release include support for new file types (tar, gz, and bzip2), updates to the local audio and video player, and new modes for multiple monitor handling. Unfortunately, early-adopting Cr-48 owners are out of luck — the build of Chrome OS in question is only for Acer AC700 and Samsung Series 5 Chromebooks.

New XBOX 360 with Kinect and Nike+ for 299$. That’s what Microsoft is planning.

According to Amazon’s product page, the package will be shipped on December 4th. The popular consumer sales site is now taking pre-orders for the package. The deal itself is important for two reasons: the price of the Xbox 360 and Kinect hardware is in decline it would seem, as the paired devices are now selling a lower individual unit cost, bundled with other content, in this case a game that usually retails for around $50. Thus, Microsoft is selling the Xbox 360 and Kinect sensor for what could be called a theoretical $250 price point. However, that is an exaggeration as Microsoft is likely not paying full retail to its partner. Keep in mind that the the Kinect was priced at $149.99 when it was released. However, even then, a Kinect/Xbox 360 bundle was available for $299. Thus, the decline in unit costs isn’t great, as the addition of royalties to Nike as part of the package would only lessen the unit revenue for Microsoft a touch. However, as Microsoft looks to retain its top sales crown through this year and into the next, bundles like this could be key to its continued strong sales. Final note: How interesting is it that Microsoft’s Christmas sales strategy for the Xbox 360 doesn’t revolve around a serious game, but instead a workout application that might appeal to a whole family? Demographic shift indeed.

Photo credits: Futurilla